Wednesday, June 6, 2018

Need some extra cash ? Would you consider 'selling' or 'renting' your DNA ?


Consumers will soon be able to sell or rent their DNA to scientists who are trying to fight diseases as different as dementia, lupus and leukemia.

Bio-brokers want to collect everything from someone’s 23andMe and Ancestry.com gene data to fully sequenced genomes.
The data would be sold or rented to biomedical institutes, universities and pharmaceutical companies, generating money for consumers who share their genetic secrets.


The roundup is mostly led by Luna DNA of Solana Beach and Nebula Genomics of San Francisco, startups that are still figuring out how much a person would be paid for their contribution.
It’s part of the booming bio-economy, where so-called “sequencing subsidies” are starting to emerge.
Scientists say they need enormous amounts of genetic data from across different ethnic, racial and age groups, and different genders, to develop diagnostics and drugs.

Additional story at: The San Diego Union-Tribune: http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/news/science/sd-me-genes-consumerguide-20180514-story.html
(photo/its.gov)

Friday, June 1, 2018

Cherry Fritters - 1915


Like to prowl yard sales for vintage cookbooks ? So do I, among other "treasures, " to uncover. A recent find was, The Boston Cooking School Cookbook, by Fannie Merritt Farmer, copyright 1918.

In 1902, Mrs. Farmer left the Boston Cooking School and founded Farmer's School of Cookery. In addition to running her school, she traveled to speaking engagements around the United States and continued to write cookbooks. In 1904, she published Food and Cookery for the Sick and Convalescent, which provided food recommendations for specific diseases, nutritional information for children and information on the digestive system, among other topics.

Farmer's expertise in the areas of nutrition and illness led her to lecture at Harvard Medical School. Farmer died January 15, 1915, at age 57. After her death, Alice Bradley, who taught at Miss Farmer's School of Cookery, took over the business and ran it until the mid-1940s. The Fannie Farmer Cookbook is still in print today.

Here's a sampling of a special treat from this vintage cookbook.


Cherry Fritters
2 cups scalded milk
1/4 cup corn-starch
1/4 cup flour
1/2 cup sugar
1/4 tsp salt
1/4 cup cold milk
3 egg yolks
1/2 cup Marachino cherries
Mix corn-starch, flour, sugar and salt. Dilute with cold milk and add beaten yolks; then add gradually to scalded milk and cook fifteen minutes in a double boiler. Add cherries, pour into a buttered shallow tin, and cool.

Turn on a board, cut in squares, dip in flour, egg and crumbs, fry in deep fat, and drain. Serve with the Marachino Sauce.

Marachino Sauce
2/3 cup boiling water
1/3 cup sugar
2 tablespoons corn-starch
1/4 cup Marachino cherries, cut in halves
1/2 cup Marachino syrup
1/2 tablespoon butter
Mix sugar and corn-starch, add gradually to boiling water, stirring constantly. Boil for five minutes, and add the cherries, syrup and butter.
(The Boston Cooking School Cookbook 1918)

Amazing new database of 18th and 19th Century Ireland launched



How was Ireland depicted in illustrations produced by traveller's from 1680 to 1860?

A new database of images drawn from travel accounts answers this question.

Based on years of research by a group of investigators at NUI Galway led by Professor Jane Conroy, Ireland Illustrated is now available to view online.

Ireland Illustrated, 1680-1860, is a database of over 500 images of Ireland – woodcuts, water colors,  engravings and other illustrations – with related text, drawn from more than 50 manuscript and printed works, and highlighting several neglected or rarely accessible sources.
Many of the pictures in the database, woodcuts, water colors, engravings and other illustrations, have rarely, if ever, been seen by the public.
(Galway Daily)

Additional story and sketches at: https://www.galwaydaily.com/news/amazing-new-database-with-pics-of-18th-and-19th-century-ireland-launched/

Tuesday, May 29, 2018

Scotch Tape - the curse of every conservator



Sticky tape was first invented in the mid-19th century, and it’s been making conservators’ lives hell ever since.

“Tape is the bane of the conservator’s existence,” says Margaret Holben Ellis, a professor of paper conservation at New York University. The problem is simply that tape works too well. Removing it can easily take off a layer of paper, and adhesives from old tape can sink into paper, staining it an unsightly yellow or brown.
You can’t really blame people for using tape, says Elissa O’Loughlin, a former conservator at the Walters Art Museum, who co-teaches a five-day course on paper conservation. “It’s just human nature,” she says. “It was seen as a miracle product.” Pressure-sensitive tape, to use the official term, is much more convenient and easy to use compared to older adhesives that required heat or water. Of course, people would use it to repair rips in drawings and documents, without thinking of conservators in the future.

To read more go to: https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2018/05/how-to-get-scotch-tape-off-of-a-work-of-art/560738/

Maybe DNA Can't Answer All Our Questions About Heredity


HEREDITY is a powerful concept. It’s the thing that ties families together—that gives shape to their shared history of stories, of homes, of personalities. And more and more, it’s the way we understand families’ shared genetic inheritance. But that more modern biological notion of heredity comes with some new, technical baggage: It’s easier to talk about the high blood pressure that runs in your family than it is to discern the alleles that define it, all the meiotic divisions that had to occur before that trait was passed down to you. And misunderstanding the role DNA does or doesn’t play in determining one’s fate can have dangerous consequences.

Luckily, acclaimed science writer Carl Zimmer is here to unravel the tangled history of the science and pseudoscience surrounding heredity, in all its many forms. In his expansive, engrossing, and often enlightening new book, She Has Her Mother’s Laugh.

To read more on this fascinating concept, go to: https://www.wired.com/story/maybe-dna-cant-answer-all-our-questions-about-heredity/

Monday, May 28, 2018

Last Will & Testament of Zephaniah Clement


History of Early Bibb County, Alabama 1820-1870, by Ulysses Huey Abrams
The Will of Zephaniah Clement Will of Zephaniah Clement, Bibb Co., AL
Copied from the original will in the files of Probate Office.


I Zephaniah Clement of the Co. of Bibb & State of AL being weak in body, but of sound & perfect mind & memory, do make & publish this my last will & Testament, in manner & form following (to wit) First I give & bequeat unto my beloved son Stephen Clement One Dolar over & above the amount he has already received - I do also give & bequeat unto my beloved son William Clement One Negro girl named Nell & one Horse, & one cow & Calf worth Ten dollars & one Bed & furniture worth ten dollars & one Bed & furniture worth fifty dollars to him & his heirs forever -

I also give & bequeat unto my beloved son Thomas Clement on negro girl named Harriett one Horse worth $100 one Bed & furniture worth fifty dollars & one cow & calf worth ten dollars, to him & his heirs forever- I do also give & bequeat unto my beloved son Luellen Clemment one negro girl named Rose & one Horse worth $100 one Bed & furniture worth fifty dollars one Cow & calf worth fifty dollars, tho him & his heirs forever.

I do also give & bequeat unto my beloved son Alfred Clement one negro girl named Amy one Bed & furniture worth fifty dollars, & one cow & calf worth ten dollars, to him & his heirs for-ever I do leave in the care of my executors for the support & maintenance of my beloved dau. Isabel Clemment one negro girl named Writta one bed & furniture worth fifty dollars & one cow & calf worth ten dollars to her during her natural life, & then to return to her Brothers & sisters to be equally divided among them.

 I do also give & bequeat unto my beloved dau. Polly Wash one negro girl named Fanny one Horse worth one Hundred dollars, one Bed & furntiure worth fifty dollars one cow & calf worth ten dollars, eifht head of hogs worth fifty dollars to her & her heirs forever. I do also give & bequeat unto my beloved dau. Susanna Terry one negro girl named Mirah & Hundred dollars in money one bed & furniture worth fifty dollars one cow & calf worth ten dollars one sow & pigs worth ten dollars to her & her heirs forever- I do also give & bequeat unto my beloved dau. Leanna Clement one negro girl named Betty one Bed & furniture worth fifty dollars one cow & calf worth ten dollars to her & her heirs for ever - I do also give & bequeat unto my beloved dau. Nancy Hunt one negro girl named Dina one Mule worth one Hundred & fifty dollars One bed & furniture one cow & calf worth ten dollars, to her & her heirs forever -

I do also give & bequeat unto my beloved dau. Parsada Clement one negro girl named Juli one bed & furniture worth fifty dollars one cow & calf worth ten dollars to her & her heirs for ever - I do also give & bequeat unto my beloved dau. Anna Mariah Jones all my right & claim to certain tract of land lying in the state of SC Edgefield Co. Walnut Creek now contested by law, & in case she should fail to recover the said land that she is to receive four hundred dollars in lieu thereof out of the proceeds of my Estate to her & her heirs for ever - It is also my will that the following negroes (to wit) Gilbert, Nan, Milly, Lucy & Dicy, Judy, Pharo & Ester be kept together upon the plantation, under the care & direction of my Executors until the discharge of all my just debts, & after the discharge of said debts that the said Negroes be equally divided so as to make the smallest legacies equal with the greatest. & lastly,

I do appoint my beloved sons William & Thomas Clement & John Hunt my sole Exectuors of this my last will & Testament - hereby revoking all former wills by me made - In Witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand & seal the 25th day of Jan. in the year of our Lord one thousand & eight Hundred & twenty two.

Signed Z. Clement His Seal Signed, sealed, published, & declared by the above named Zephaniah Clement to be his last will & Testament, in the presence of us, who have hereunto subscribed our names as witnesses in presence of the Testator: P. Watkins, Samuel Cammack, & Lewis Cammack. Peter Watkins & Samuel Cammak proved the Execution of the Will 25th Feby Feb. 1822. Let it be recorded. A.M. Lusk, Judge of Bibb Co. Ct.

This will also recorded in Book C pages 10, 11, & 12.
http://www.africanaheritage.com/uploads/564/FarrisFamilyPart2uploaded.txt

Signed, sealed, published, & declared by the above named Zephaniah Clement to be his last will & Testament, in the presence of us, who have hereunto subscribed our names as witnesses in presence of the Testator: P. Watkins, Samuel Cammack, & Lewis Cammack. Peter Watkins & Samuel Cammak proved the Execution of the Will 25th Feby Feb. 1822. Let it be recorded. A.M. Lusk, Judge of Bibb Co. Ct. This will also recorded in Book C pages 10, 11, & 12.

This was published in the "Alabama Sentinel" which was printed and published by Thomas B. Grantland of Tuscaloosa, Alabama.  "March 24, 1826
 Adv. Bibb County 6 March 1826.  John Hunt, one of executors of will of Zephaniah Clement, deceased with William Clement and Thomas Clement to make final settlement."

Zephaniah's estate was appraised on March 9, 1822 for $7,087.50.
What cost $7,087.50 in 1822 would cost  $132,461.80 in 2017. Inflation Calculator http://www.westegg.com/inflation/infl.cgi

Thursday, January 11, 2018

Roots Web Site is Currently Unavailable



We have been in the process of improving the site throughout 2017, and as a result of an issue we recently became aware of, we have taken the site offline while we work to resolve it. We take the security of our contributors and our viewers seriously. We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause, but protecting our users’ personal information is our top priority.

Update: January 9, 2018

We have spent the last few weeks reviewing the functionality on RootsWeb and have created a plan to bring many of your contributions back online over the next few months. As we stated before, our first priority is security, and ensuring that every part of RootsWeb meets our stringent security standards. Our next priority is getting you, the users of RootsWeb and its services, access to your content.

Right now, the best way for us to meet both goals is to begin bringing portions of RootsWeb back online in a read-only state. This means you will have access to content, but you will not be able to load new content in these sections. While this may not be ideal, it is the best way for us to protect RootsWeb users while also providing the ability to use the content you value. This is an interim step while we continue to evaluate the potential for bringing more of the RootsWeb services back online in a more complete manner.

Here’s our current plan:
Hosted Web Sites: Soon we will begin bringing Hosted Web Sites back online. We will start with a few hundred and then add more over time, giving us a chance to scan the content.

Family Trees/WorldConnect: Family Trees or WorldConnect allows you to upload a GEDCOM file and publish it for others to see. It is currently being reviewed by our software engineers and security team and we plan on having a read-only, searchable version up in the next few weeks. The ability to upload new GEDCOM files will be available in the coming months.

Mailing Lists: Mailing Lists have been functioning as normal, but the archives have been unavailable. We plan to make the archives available to you once we have WorldConnect available to you in a readable version.

We will be making decisions about other functionality over time.

We appreciate your patience as we bring the different pieces of RootsWeb back online in a secure manner. You, our contributors and viewers, are what has made RootsWeb the vibrant free genealogy community it is.

The RootsWeb Team