Saturday, January 30, 2016

Best of the Best Habits for a Highly Organized Genealogist

Posted by Diane
   Why is organizing genealogy stuff perpetually challenging for so many of us? Maybe because finding new ancestry information is more fun than logging it. And organization isn't a one-way-fits-everyone kind of deal—the system and tools best for you depend on how your brain works.
 But the pros will tell you that organizing is an important part of research. It helps you figure out how the new piece fits into your family tree and form conclusions about your ancestors.
1. Keep the big picture in mind. You can use genealogy charts such as five-generation ancestor charts and family group sheets to help you visualize how your relatives fit together, or try an online family tree builder with an app on your smart phone. (Find free downloadable blank forms on FamilyTreeMagazine.com.) It’s also handy to have a large working family tree chart, where you can see the whole thing at once. 

2. Take charge of paper files.
Set up a filing system for family papers. Many researchers use binders or file folders arranged alphabetically by surname. Each surname folder holds papers from a couple’s marriage to their death, as well as any general notes. Children go in their parents’ folder, then get their own folder when they marry. You also might keep folders for towns or counties, with maps, historical background and local research notes.
3. Go digital. To save space in paper files and create electronic backups, scan photos and paper documents. Organize digital files with the same system as your paper files. Determine a file-naming scheme, write it down and stick to it.

4. Establish an organization routine.
If you regularly take short chunks of time to file stuff, it becomes second nature. Set up an inbox on your desk or computer hard drive for items you need to take action on (scan, label, etc.) and a “to file” folder for documents ready to be put away. Once a week or month, schedule time to empty these boxes.
5. Take advantage of tech tools. You can organize with tons of tech tools and apps, such as Evernote for tracking information and research findings, Calibre to manage e-books, Flickr for photos, Excel spreadsheets for checklists and logs. Find some of our favorite genealogy apps listed here.
6. Designate a workspace. If you’re like many of us, your genealogy workspace may double as a guest bedroom, dining room table or living room floor. Try to have a designated spot for your files, computer and books.

7. Color-code folders and files.
You could use a color for each surname, though you’d probably run out of colors before too long. I'd color code by branch with a different color for each of my grandparents’ lines. Color-code computer files and folders to match: On a Mac, click on a folder or file in the finder window and then click the down arrow next to the gear icon. From the drop-down menu, select Label and the color. PCs don’t have built-in folder color-coding, but you can download a program such as
Folderico.
8. Create a kit for on-site research. Prepare a bag with tools you might need for research at a repository: notebook, pen, pencil, money for the copier, flash drive, a family group sheet, surname variant lists, blank census or passenger list recording forms, etc. Now you won’t have to run around gathering stuff when you leave for the library.
http://blog.familytreemagazine.com/insider/2016/01/19/8HabitsOfHighlyOrganizedGenealogists.aspx?utm_source=source=newsletter&utm_campaign=campaign=sft-dha-nl-160121&utm_content=814249_FTI160121&utm_medium=email

Thursday, January 28, 2016

E-Z Photo Scan announces free scanning at RootsTech

 
The following announcement was written by the folks at E-Z Photo Scan:
Scanning leader sets goal for 100,000 scans at global family history event
Jan. 27, 2016
Altamonte Springs, Fla. – E-Z Photo Scan, the leading marketer of desktop photo-scanning systems, announced RootsTech attendees can have their prints and slides scanned for free during the event, Feb. 3-6, 2016, in Salt Lake City. In 2015, E-Z Photo Scan booth attendees scanned 98,561 prints at RootsTech, and this year, a goal of 100,000 scans has been set.
To participate, RootsTech attendees can bring their photo prints, scrapbook pages and slides to expo booth 1109 during exhibit hours Thursday-Saturday. To make image storage easy and simple, E-Z Photo Scan will use the latest technology to make photos available to attendees after the event. These treasured digital memories can be stored on FamilySearch and other genealogy sites. Also, on Saturday, E-Z Photo Scan is part of the interactive activities of Family Discovery Day.
“To reach our 100,000 free scan goal, we’re bringing our full array of photo scanning equipment, including the Kodak Picture Saver scanner, SlideSnap Lite and Shotbox,” says Richard “Rick” Lippert, president, E-Z Photo Scan. “Simply bring your prints and slides to digitize them for free. It’s fast, easy and fun.”
For information about attending RootsTech, visit www.rootstech.org
ABOUT E-Z PHOTO SCAN
Founded in 1995, E-Z Photo Scan has worked with many community centers, historical societies, museums, and individuals to help them organize and preserve their photos and documents. Their team has long recognized the need for photo organization and management service providers, having seen individuals who find digitizing photographic archives to be a daunting, expensive and time-consuming task. It was awarded Kodak Picture Saver Scanning Systems Global Value-Added Re-Seller Leader of the Year.
ABOUT ROOTSTECH
RootsTech is a global family history event, where people of all ages learn to discover, share, and celebrate their family connections across generations through technology. At RootsTech, there is something for everyone, no matter your experience in family history or your skill level in technology. RootsTech will be held on Feb. 3-6, 2016, at the Salt Palace Convention Center in Salt Lake City, Utah. Innovator Summit will be held on Feb. 3, 2016, also at the Salt Palace.
(Eastmans Newsletter 27 Jan 2016)